Umpires Ruled the Day
Christopher Cushna | 10/27/13 | 4:37 PM EDT 0 Comments
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St. Louis takes important to 2-1 lead on controversial play.


There are moments that all true Sox fans can tell you about.  19
46, when Johnny Pesky held the ball. 1975, when Carlton Fisk was called for interference. 1978, Bucky Dent's homerun. 1986, the ball between Bill Buckner's legs. 2003, the game when Pedro Martinez stayed in too long.

All of these memories were erased when the 2004 Red Sox won the World Series. And they eased further into oblivion, when the 2007 Red Sox won it again.


Now it's 2013. The ending to game three with an error by Will Middlebrooks may become another defining moment. It's a play that has been different opinions from Boston homers or St. Louis apologists.


The fact is, Boston never should've been in the position to lose the game on a questionable call. Several mistakes were made throughout the game, resulting in a tie game in the ninth. For the second game in a row, a Boston player tried too hard to make a play at third. And there were other questions as well, including why a picture bats in a tie game in the top of the inning.

But in the end, an umpire made a ruling on a judgment call. The umpire can hide behind quotes like intent doesn't matter, or the runner defines the baseline. But this is the same umpire who blew the almost perfect game in Detroit. 

There are players that are called ball magnets, because it always seems the ball finds them. There are umpires that become attention magnets, because they always seem to be in the middle of a controversial call.
In this Article: RED SOX | CARDINALS | WORLD SERIES | WILL MIDDLEBROOKS

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